About the Apiary - November 1996

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November 96

November is a fickle month. In the pastoral areas there is usually a dearth of flowers and hives need to be watched closely for signs of starvation and fed to sustain their continued growth.

In the urban areas, everything seems to come into flower and the hives are packing the honey in. Unfortunately they can quickly become overcrowded and swarm at this time of the year.

About the Apiary - October 1996

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October 96

Its all on. October is the most important month in beekeeping. The bees are expanding at an alarming rate and those eggs laid in October, produce the bees that bring in the honey crop during December. If you neglect one aspect, swarming is triggered and if one gets away, there goes your honey crop.

What should you be doing?

About the Apiary - September 1996

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September 96

Winter time is a catch up time. Making new gear, a once round of the bees to see they are all right, preparing the garden for spring or just sitting in the sun reading a good bee book.

About the Apiary - August 1996

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August 96

While winter rages around, tucked up in their snug hive, the bees are stirring. Well that’s basically what’s happening. In fact, apart from the rain (which fell on 21 days last month and was double the average), it has been mild with the average high of about 12oC.

About the Apiary - June 1996

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June 96

Well, I’m now bringing in the last of my honey crop. A bit late considering its now 8 deg C outside. Unfortunately, I’ve found another diseased hive. They are usually the best ones and this was no exception, 6 high, chocker with honey. Put a bit of a damper on the day when its the first one you inspect, however its better found now than later in the spring.

About the Apiary - May 1996

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May 96

Well for most of our area, hives are now set for winter with the bees forming a cluster on the centre frames and only venturing out on warm days.

However, in the Otaki area, the Kohekohe (also known as native cedar) has just started flowering. This tree flowers from May to July in the costal forests and is unusual in that the flowers form on long branched stalks which spring from the bare parts of the trunk and branches. The flowers are waxy in appearance and produce water white honey which is too late in the autumn to extract (Ref R.S. Walsh).

About the Apiary - April 1996

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April 96

Well, for most, the seasonal work is all done and now its just a matter of getting rid of your surplus honey.

However, in the hives the last of the brood is being reared and the bees are dragging down honey from the top and outside frames and packing it around the brrod nest ready to go into a cluster.

Photo Album

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The following photographs of Wellington Beekeepers and associated flowers, scenes, and activities illustrate the range of club members interests

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The following photographs of Wellington Beekeepers and associated flowers, scenes, and activities illustrate the range of club members interests

Photos - Diseaseathon 2000

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Photos from the Diseaseathon carried out in Upper Hutt area on Saturday 11th November 2000 (Page 4) Click on each picture to display a copy in more detail

Photos from the Diseaseathon carried out in Upper Hutt area on Saturday 11th November 2000 (Page 4)

Click on each picture to display a copy in more detail

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