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Beginners Beekeeping Course

Last year the club ran a course for beginner beekeepers which proved very popular, so it will be repeated again this year.  The course will consist of five x two-hour indoor sessions, plus one practical session at the Club's hives at Chartwell.

Hi I use oxalic acid as a...

Hi I use oxalic acid as a more control but the last couple of times instead of vaporizing it has turned into crystals that completely cover the hearing pan and look a bit like hoar frost. Is this because it's not getting hot enough? Has anyone experienced this and know how to fix it?

Understanding Tutin and the Risks

The Bee Products Standards Council, in conjunction with MPI and ApiNZ has produced a paper on tutin.  All beekeepers, whether they sell their honey or not, need to be aware of the risks of tutin contamination or honey and the requirements of the Tutin in Honey food standard.   The paper is available on our website:

http://www.beehive.org.nz/groups/public/understanding-tutin-and-risks-0

 

Swarm or Split wanted

Hi all,

Having recently returned from overseas I collected my bee gear from the people I lent it to, unfortunately their hive had died, so I find myself with no bees.

I would therefore be very interested in acquiring a swarm or a surplus split if anyone comes across or has one please.

Thanks

Jonathan 0276119561

25 Box Hill, Khandallah

Website Guide

The first release of a new website guide is now available on the website itself. Look under "Help" on the main menu at the top of the page.

This guide is structured as a "book" with an index and each page being linked to the next (and the preceding) one. You can go directly to the section that most interests you, or you can browse through the entire document.

Additional information will be added over time to cover the complete functionality of the website.

Please advise any errors or suggestions for improvements to me.

Beginning in Bees

The committee is looking to run a "beginning in bees" for new members.

This is a 10 hour course spread over five week nights, 2 hours a night. Suitable for new beekeepers who do not have bees at present.  Course cost is $200 and will be restricted to a maximum of 20 participants.

The course starts Monday 31 October at 7 pm in the Trust Room of the Johnsonville Community Centre, Moorefield Street. This is the room above the Community Centre Hall, opposite Countdown. (The same room where we hold the beginners meetings).

Proposal to run a training course

The committee is planning to run a training course for members wanting to learn more about beekeeping.  This will probably be starting on late October or early November and will be based on one developed in Australia. More details will be posted on the website shortly.

James

Hi. We are introducing...

sysman's picture
Hi. We are introducing exciting new functionality for the Wellington Beekeepers website, so watch this space. Details of how you can use this will be sent to all members shortly, but in the meantime, all the old information is available on the site. James

Are there any experienced...

Are there any experienced members that can come to my house to advise if I have a suitable location for a hive? I live in central Lower Hutt.

Understanding Tutin and the Risks

Please see attached document from MPI regarding Tutin and the risks to honey.  Whilst tutin is not a major risk to honey in the Wellington area, it is the responsibility of all beekeepers to be aware of the danger of tutin-infected honey.

All beekeepers are advised to follow the tutin standards, even if they do not intend to sell their honey.

Understanding Tutin and the Risks

Please see attached document from MPI regarding Tutin and the risks to honey.  Whilst tutin is not a major risk to honey in the Wellington area, it is the responsibility of all beekeepers to be aware of the danger of tutin-infected honey.

All beekeepers are advised to follow the tutin standards, even if they do not intend to sell their honey.

All about bee swarms

Bee Swarms are the natural way that bee colonies multiply to increase their numbers. In the world of bees, an individual is not the important entity, as most bees cannot reproduce. The important unit is the colony, which contains a queen (or occasionally multiple queens) responsible for laying eggs which the colony as a whole hatches and raises.  It is therefore important for the survival of bees, that colonies "reproduce", which is done by the bees splitting into two groups, one of which stay in the hive, and the other departs to find a new hive.

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Lisa Polaschek commented on Hi there, new to bee... in the Public group
Thu, 23/11/2017 - 12:09
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Lisa Polaschek commented on Hi there, new to bee... in the Public group
Thu, 23/11/2017 - 12:09
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